Another Perfect Plant: Aruncus x ‘Misty lace’

Large drifts of  Aruncus x ‘Misty Lace’  take center stage among ferns, hellebore, and beesia along the Pike Street Hill Climb. (Planting design for  The Friends of Waterfront Seattle  by Land Morphology.)

Large drifts of Aruncus x ‘Misty Lace’ take center stage among ferns, hellebore, and beesia along the Pike Street Hill Climb. (Planting design for The Friends of Waterfront Seattle by Land Morphology.)

“Misty”, “frothy”, and “feathery” are all words that come to mind when admiring the dreamy inflorescences of Aruncus, a genus known by the common name of goatbeard or bride’s feathers.

 Aruncus x ‘Misty Lace’ is a hybrid between Aruncus aethusifolius and the native A. dioicus. Aruncus dioicus can be seen growing in forests, moist meadows and riparian areas throughout Washington state and many parts of North America. Goatsbeard thrives in partial to full shade with consistent water, and combines well with other woodland plants. While our native goatsbeard can get up to four to six feet tall and wide, ‘Misty Lace’ tops out at about two feet tall and wide.

Misty Lace goatsbeard is a fine-textured plant in many respects; from the astilbe-like pinnately compound leaves, to the elongate panicles of tiny white flowers that come out in spring through early summer. This plant’s soft, airy quality is maximized when planted in large swaths.

Sources:

Missouri Botanical Garden

Monrovia

US Forest Service

Colleen BrennanComment